Development of Proper Movement Starts Early...How Early?

Michael A. Rintala, D.C.
DNS Practitioner/Instructor, Prague School of Rehabilitation
PGA Tour Sports Medicine Team
BIO

I am so honored to welcome Michael Rintala as Move2Thrive's newest "Movement Ambassador". I am truly honored that Michael is supporting our mission. Michael understands human motor development almost better than anybody in this country, and I am excited to share his unique understanding of Developmental Kinesiology. 


Development of human motor function in early childhood is genetically predetermined and follows a predictable pattern as evidenced in the study of Developmental Kinesiology.

As the healthy central nervous system (CNS) matures during the first 2 years of life there are specific milestones (3 month, 6 month, 8 month, etc.) in which the infant is able to attain control of certain postures automatically (subcortical level of CNS), create ideal muscle synergies against gravity and performed certain tasks with ideal activation of the Integrated Stabilization System of the Spine (ISSS). This development of optimal muscle synergies is related to optimal structural development allowing for normal formation of the skeleton.

The ideal activation of the deep stabilizing System or ISSS is "hard-wired", and genetically encoded. Thus it is something that we are able to access for the rest of our lives. From 2-6 years of age (and later) Cortical integration allows for motor learning, selective movement, motor dexterity, and agility in sports performance.

During childhood and progressing into adulthood there are a number of things that can interfere with the utilization/facilitation of these ideal “hard-wired” motor patterns. For Example:
       Postural & Sport habituation, Cultural influences, lack of ideal movement or
       play, and protective patterns due to trauma or injury

It is important to facilitate and enhance inborn patterns of quality instead of focusing on just the quantity of movement during early childhood. By applying and guiding the types of play during development we will enable the child to withstand the deluge of assaults on their ideal movement.

It is up to us to help guide these children and allow them to thrive. 

Michael A. Rintala, D.C.
DNS Practitioner/Instructor, Prague School of Rehabilitation
PGA Tour Sports Medicine Team
www.rehabps.com